Alba Botanica Soothing Sunscreen Pure Lavender SPF 45 Lotion

Overall Product Rating

5 out of 5

Poor Rating..............Best Rating

How We Measure This

At Clean Label Project, we believe that when it comes to industrial and environmental contaminants,…

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Overall Rating for this Brand

3.8 out of 5

Poor Rating..............Best Rating

Type of Product

Product Tags


Product Purity

5 out of 5

Poor Rating..............Best Rating

Product Value

5 out of 5

Poor Rating..............Best Rating

Details

Clean Label Project was formed with the mission to serve as the catalyst to change the definition of food and consumer product safety in America. Clean Label Project believes that when it comes to environmental and industrial contaminants, less is better than more. Not only are the compounds potentially hazardous, knowledge on the long-term effects of exposure to these contaminants is concerning and still developing.

For more details on the rationale behind the product ratings, see the below breakdown on this product's analytical chemistry test results compared to the rest of the category.

Results Summary

Arsenic / Cadmium
5 out of 5

Poor Rating..............Best Rating

Heavy metal exposure via sunscreen is interesting. The latest innovations in sunscreen applications appear to be spritzers and aerosol-sprays. They have soared in popularity because they’re quick and easy to apply on squirmy children and hard-to-reach places.

 

Heavy metal uptake can occur via inhalation and ingestion exposure, while dermal absorption is thought to be minimal. Given that we are talking about sunscreen, dermal exposure is still important as it can contribute to ingestion exposure due to transfer from the skin to the mouth via the fingers when enjoying a BBQ or picnic in the summer sun.1 This is especially important for the products that are marketing to caregivers of small children. Also, for consumers that use the spritzers or aerosol-spray sunscreens, inhalation exposure is relevant as heavy metals can be absorbed directly through the lungs.

 

1https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.asp?csem=34&po=6

Mercury / Lead
5 out of 5

Poor Rating..............Best Rating

Heavy metal exposure via sunscreen is interesting. The latest innovations in sunscreen applications appear to be spritzers and aerosol-sprays. They have soared in popularity because they’re quick and easy to apply on squirmy children and hard-to-reach places.

 

Heavy metal uptake can occur via inhalation and ingestion exposure, while dermal absorption is thought to be minimal. Given that we are talking about sunscreen, dermal exposure is still important as it can contribute to ingestion exposure due to transfer from the skin to the mouth via the fingers when enjoying a BBQ or picnic in the summer sun.1 This is especially important for the products that are marketing to caregivers of small children. Also, for consumers that use the spritzers or aerosol-spray sunscreens, inhalation exposure is relevant as heavy metals can be absorbed directly through the lungs.

 

 

1https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.asp?csem=34&po=6

Oxybenzone / Octinoxate / Sulfates
4 out of 5

Poor Rating..............Best Rating

Oxybenzone and Octinoxate are two of the most common chemical filters found in commercial chemical sunscreens. Their primary function is to serve as an active ingredient in sunscreen and absorb UV light. However, both of these chemicals have come under scrutiny for two reasons:

  • They have been identified as having endocrine disruptive properties. Which means that they mimic the effects of hormones in the body and can have adverse effects on fertility and the developing systems in fetuses and babies1
  • They have been banned by the State of Hawaii because of the damage they cause to marine ecosystems- especially coral reefs.2

 

Sulfate compounds (commonly called sulfates) are found in many personal care products. There are hundreds of varieties of sulfates, but sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium laureth sulfate (SLES) are the ones most commonly used in personal care products. These chemicals are considered safe by Health Canada, the European Union and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, they have also been identified as irritants and in some people can temporarily aggravate the skin, causing redness, dryness and itching. They also frequently use petroleum and many brands are gravitating away from sulfates for sustainability purposes since petroleum is a non-renewable resource.3

Finding an EFFECTIVE sunscreen is especially important. Work with your dermatologist or family doctor to determine a sunscreen that is the right fit for you and your family.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22612478

2 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2018/05/02/hawaii-might-be-about-to-ban-your-favorite-sunscreen-to-protect-its-coral-reefs/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.ef0835e6109d

https://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-looks/skin/the-truth-about-sulfates/

API / Efficacy
2 out of 5

Poor Rating..............Best Rating

Results of “At-Home Sun Paper Efficacy Comparison Test”:

Clean Label Project wanted to have some fun with this one and encourage consumers at home to do the same. Sunscreens always make a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) Claim. These numbers can range from 3 to 100 and they are intended to communicate the product’s ability to screen or block out the sun’s burning rays.

 

Clean Label Project wanted to see how products within the same SPF performed against each other. So we ran a test using sun paper- paper with light sensitive chemicals that change color when exposed to UVA/UVB light. We were surprised at the variability of the results within the same SPF. You can learn more about how we completed this “at-home” test here.

 

Antioxidant Power:

Antioxidants protect from the development of free radicals in the body, which can cause skin damage and aging.1 It’s exactly these types of properties that are important in the fight against the harmful effects of both the sun’s rays AND industrial and environmental contaminants and toxins.

 

https://www.aad.org/media/news-releases/new-study-supports-recommendation-to-use-broad-spectrum-sunscreen-for-protection-against-skin-cancer-and-early-aging

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